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A SHRIEK FROM AN INVISIBLE BOX, REVISITED II
Photographs are from A SHRIEK FROM AN INVISIBLE BOX, 2001 Meguro Museum catalogue.
Published and edited by Meguro Museum of Art, Tokyo • Designed by Tsutomu Ohmukai / Ohmukai Design Office • Photographed by Tadaaki Nakagawa / Artec Studio
Andolcetti • Diamond • Fialdini • Fonseca • Haruki • Hellyar • Higgs • Ito • Lyckander • Manfredi • Mowbray • Plum • Rosetta • Stancke • Suvorova v Twentyman-Jones • Warner
A SHRIEK FROM AN INVISIBLE BOX REVISITED II is the second of a three-part show at Medialia. Originally a gathering of work by 100 international artists, A SHRIEK FROM AN INVISIBLE BOX exhibited at the Meguro Museum, Tokyo, Japan, in 2001. The exhibition was curated by the independent curator, Mashiko Nakashima. In the effort to bring this exhibition to the United States, the orginal show has been divided into installments, because of spacial limitations. The specifications for the work were originally, and are now:

• Each artist will have a single horizontal or vertical space
(no suspensions from the ceiling) 8"(H) x 14" x 14"
• Within this space each artist will place a minimum of 3 three-dimensional works
• Each of the works can be either independent or related to the other works
• Each work cannot be larger than 8"(H) x 7" x 7"

The intention of this exhibition is to present how an artist interprets a limited space with a minimum of three works, and with a given size for each work. The reason for a minimum of three pieces is to further enhance the power of the artists visual statement. The interrelationship of the three works is left to the artist. This exhibition is a unique three-dimensional exhibition, not a small maquette display. However, having a theme title for the exhibition unifies to an extent the overall expression of the exhibit.

The following is taken from the text of the original exhibition catalogue, A SHRIEK FROM AN INVISIBLE BOX, 2001, Meguro Museum of Art, which was written by Mashiko Nakashima. I am most grateful to Mr. Shigeki Fukunaga for having given me the opportunity to curate an exhibition at the Meguro Museum of Art, Tokyo. The most profoundly sad occurrence was Mr. Fukunaga suddenly passing away on August 5, while he was attending the special exhibition, Contemporary Japanese Prints, at the Guanajuato State Museum in Guanajuato, Mexico ...

Mr. Fukunaga had written in the 2001 Shriek exhibition invitation to the participating artists: ... This exhibition is curated by our guest curator, Mashiko Nakashima. The exhibition was realized because of her precise and continuous world-wide search for artists for the last several years. I, as the director of the Meguro Museum of Art, Tokyo, am truly looking forward to seeing your actual work and concept for this particular exhibition.

Because of the limited size and space available to each artist, the Meguro Museum is able to exhibit nearly 100 works. The small scale work here is not a maquette for large scale art, but, it is a finished entity. Because of the limited scale, proficient technical skill will be evident in the exhibition ...

September 15th through October 30th, 2004